Student Survival 101–Club Control

 By Alyse Allred

Over the last couple weeks, I’ve noticed a change in the locker bays (aside from the fresh, first-nine-weeks stench). Whereas earlier everything was barren, we are now practically drowning in brightly colored fliers. This, of course, can only mean one thing: The clubs have arrived.

With the first term nearing its end, the club callouts have come and gone. This, however, has not stemmed the flood. If anything, it’s spread to the rest of the school, as larger and more vibrant posters keep popping up and the school announcements last roughly an eternity. I’m not complaining about it, though. In my opinion, our very school themed blue-and-gray lockers could use some livening up. It just drew my attention to West Side’s clubs as a whole.

Which more or less brings me to today’s topic: How to avoid death by school clubs. The clubs in themselves are wonderful opportunities for social ization, academic improvement, and community service hours; however, there can be too much of a good thing. Students at West Side appear to suffer from acute cases of COS, or Club Overload Syndrome, without even realizing it. The result: severe strain on personal health and mental stability. For most students at this high school, their priorities seem to fall into an inverted triangle that looks something like this:

 

As implied by the shape, the inverted triangle is very easy to tip over into insanity. In order to prevent the entire structure from collapsing, when something new is added, another area must be reduced. Club activities belong in the “Everything Else” section, along with social life, religion, sports, etc… When too many clubs are added, another area has to suffer. And here’s a hint: it probably isn’t “Academics” or “Food.”

So, long story short, be wary about which clubs you choose. In the long run, running back and forth between 10+ clubs on a weekly basis will probably set you more behind than ahead. And who needs that many one-time-use t-shirt anyway?

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Student views published on this website and in the print edition of The Scarlette do not necessarily reflect the views of the faculty, staff, or administration of West Lafayette High School or WLCSC.